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Bogdan Petrov
Bogdan Petrov

What Is A Limit Order When Buying Stocks



To place a buy limit order, you will first need to determine your limit price for the security you want to buy. The limit price is the maximum amount you are willing to pay to buy the security. If your order is triggered, it will be filled at your limit price or lower.You will also need to decide when your buy limit order will expire. You can choose to allow your order to expire at the end of the trading day if it is not filled. Alternatively, you can choose to place your order as good 'til canceled (GTC). Your order will remain open until it is filled or you decide to cancel it. Your brokerage may limit the time you can keep a GTC order open (usually up to 90 days)."}},"@type": "Question","name": "What Is a Buy Stop-Limit Order?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "A buy stop-limit order combines features of a stop with a limit order. To place a buy stop-limit order, you need to decide on two price points. The first price point is the stop, which is the start of the trade's specified target price. The second price point is the limit price, which is the outside limit of the trade's price target. You must also set a time frame during which your trade is considered executable.After your stop price has been reached, your stop-limit order converts to a limit order. Your limit order will then be executed at your specified price or better. The main benefit of a buy stop-limit order is that it enables traders to better control the price at which they buy a security.","@type": "Question","name": "What Happens If a Buy Limit Order Is Not Executed?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "If a buy limit order is not executed, it will expire unfilled. The order could expire at the end of the trading day or, in the case of a good 'til canceled (GTC) order, it will expire once the trader cancels it. One of the benefits of a buy limit order is that the investor is guaranteed to pay a specified price or less to purchase a security. A downside, however, is that the investor is not guaranteed that their order will be executed."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsWhat Is a Buy Limit Order?Benefits of a Buy Limit OrderDisadvantages of a Buy Limit OrderBuy Limit Order ExampleTrading SkillsTrading OrdersBuy Limit Order: Definition, Pros & Cons, and ExampleByCory Mitchell Full Bio LinkedIn Twitter Cory Mitchell, CMT is the founder of TradeThatSwing.com. He has been a professional day and swing trader since 2005. Cory is an expert on stock, forex and futures price action trading strategies.Learn about our editorial policiesUpdated August 22, 2021Reviewed bySamantha Silberstein Reviewed bySamantha SilbersteinFull Bio LinkedIn Twitter Samantha Silberstein is a Certified Financial Planner, FINRA Series 7 and 63 licensed holder, State of California life, accident, and health insurance licensed agent, and CFA. She spends her days working with hundreds of employees from non-profit and higher education organizations on their personal financial plans.Learn about our Financial Review BoardFact checked by




what is a limit order when buying stocks



To place a buy limit order, you will first need to determine your limit price for the security you want to buy. The limit price is the maximum amount you are willing to pay to buy the security. If your order is triggered, it will be filled at your limit price or lower.


You will also need to decide when your buy limit order will expire. You can choose to allow your order to expire at the end of the trading day if it is not filled. Alternatively, you can choose to place your order as good 'til canceled (GTC). Your order will remain open until it is filled or you decide to cancel it. Your brokerage may limit the time you can keep a GTC order open (usually up to 90 days).


A buy stop-limit order combines features of a stop with a limit order. To place a buy stop-limit order, you need to decide on two price points. The first price point is the stop, which is the start of the trade's specified target price. The second price point is the limit price, which is the outside limit of the trade's price target. You must also set a time frame during which your trade is considered executable.


After your stop price has been reached, your stop-limit order converts to a limit order. Your limit order will then be executed at your specified price or better. The main benefit of a buy stop-limit order is that it enables traders to better control the price at which they buy a security.


If a buy limit order is not executed, it will expire unfilled. The order could expire at the end of the trading day or, in the case of a good 'til canceled (GTC) order, it will expire once the trader cancels it. One of the benefits of a buy limit order is that the investor is guaranteed to pay a specified price or less to purchase a security. A downside, however, is that the investor is not guaranteed that their order will be executed.


A market order is an order to buy or sell a stock at the market's current best available price. A market order typically ensures an execution, but it doesn't guarantee a specified price. Market orders are optimal when the primary goal is to execute the trade immediately. A market order is generally appropriate when you think a stock is priced right, when you are sure you want a fill on your order, or when you want an immediate execution.


A few caveats: A stock's quote typically includes the highest bid potential buyers are willing to pay to acquire the stock, lowest offer potential sellers are willing to accept to sell the stock, and the last price at which the stock traded. However, the last trade price may not necessarily be current, particularly in the case of less-liquid stocks, whose last trade may have occurred minutes or hours ago. This might also be the case in fast-moving markets, when stock prices can change significantly in a short period of time. Therefore, when placing a market order, the current bid and offer prices are generally of greater importance than the last trade price.


Generally, market orders should be placed when the market is already open. A market order placed when markets are closed would be executed at the next market open, which could be significantly higher or lower from its prior close. Between market sessions, numerous factors can impact a stock's price, such as the release of earnings, company news or economic data, or unexpected events that affect an entire industry, sector, or the market as a whole.


Note, even if the stock reached the specified limit price, your order may not be filled, because there may be orders ahead of yours. In that case, there may not be enough (or additional) sellers willing to sell at that limit price, so your order wouldn't be filled. (Limit orders are generally executed on a first come, first served basis.) That said, it's also possible your order could fill at an even better price. For example, a buy order could execute below your limit price, and a sell order could execute for more than your limit price.


While the two graphs may look similar, note that the position of the red and green arrows is reversed: the stop order to sell would trigger when the stock price hit $133 (or below), and would be executed as a market order at the current price. So, if the stock were to fall further after hitting the stop price, it's possible that the order could be executed at a price that's lower than the stop price. Conversely, for the stop order to buy, if the stock price of $142 is reached, the buy stop order could be executed at a higher price. 041b061a72


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